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What is a School Social Worker?

A School Social Worker is an advocate for students. They work to address and remove barriers affecting a students ability to learn by strengthening partnerships in the home, school and community. They provide services related to a person's social, emotional and life adjustment to school and/or society. School Social Workers provide direct and indirect services to student, families, and school personnel to promote and support student's academic and social success.

What is a School Social Worker's training?

Wisconsin School Social Workers are required to hold a masters degree in social work from an accredited university as well as a school social work licence from Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction in order to work in the school setting. This training includes but is not limited to two semesters of field work in a school setting, additional field work in an agency whose major responsibility is to service children and youth, training in mental health, psychopathology, human development, and special education.

How a school social worker can help?

  • Identify needs and provide strategies/interventions for a students' academic success by collaborating with parents, teachers, and administration on PST and student service meetings
  • Support Attendance Intervention Plans
  • Complete Social Developmental Histories with the parent as part of a students evaluation for Individual Educational Program
  • Program development: identify needs to address positive change in schools
  • Provide individual or student groups on anxiety, social skills, mindfulness, and other topics
  • Crisis intervention services to include mental health, behavior, or suicidality
  • Assist families that are in transition/homeless to know their rights under McKinney- Vento Law
  • Alleviate family stress by assisting to remove barriers in order to mobilize basic needs for students which may impede or inhibit students' academic and social success:
      • vision
      • dental
      • housing
      • clothing
      • food
      • financial needs
      • medical and mental health care
    • Mobilizing family, school, and community resources to enable the child to learn as effectively as possible in his or her educational program